Spring Week

Immerse yourself in a week of intellectual stimulation and social enjoyment designed to expand your mind.

Register

Spring Week on Campus is an annual week-long event which opens a fascinating window into some of the world-class research carries out at New Zealand’s leading university.

Morning and afternoon sessions feature lectures by distinguished University of Auckland faculty members, chosen for both their subject expertise and their passion for teaching adult students. You’ll join a group of enthusiastic adults who not only have a love of learning but also enjoy the opportunity to debate current issues and meet new people.

Enrolment options

Enrolment in a week pass ($95.00) entitles you to attend all three lectures each day Monday – Friday (15 lectures in total). Tea, coffee and biscuits are provided during the morning break each day.

Single-day pass enrolment ($35.00) entitles you to attend all three lectures on a single day.

Mix-and-match enrolment ($40.00) entitles you to attend any three lectures across the week.

Registration closes Friday 22 November

Details

  • Monday 25 – Friday 29 Nov, 10am–2:30pm
  • $95.00 incl. GST (week pass)
  • $40.00 incl. GST (mix-and-match x3)
  • $35.00 incl. GST (day pass)
  • The University of Auckland, City Campus

Lecture 1

10:00 – 11:00am
Dr Ferdinand Oswald
Faculty of Creative Arts and Industries – Architecture and Planning

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Lecture 2

11:30am – 12:30pm
Professor Andreas Neef
Faculty of Arts – Development Studies 

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Lecture 3

1:30 – 2:30pm
Associate Professor Johanna Montgomery
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences – Physiology 

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Before the Treaty of Waitangi: The first New Zealand school

10:00 – 11:00am
Professor Alison Jones
Faculty of Education and Social Work – Te Puna Wananga 

The story of the first school in New Zealand is, surprisingly, a Māori story. The school opened more than 20 years before the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. It was a part of the first permanent Pākehā settlement in this country, and started with 24 Māori pupils on 12 August 1816 in the Bay of Islands. The settlement, and the teacher, had been invited by northern Māori who had visited Australia and were interested in writing and reading as future-oriented skills for their people. This lecture gives insight into the fascinating 50 years of pre-Treaty Māori-Pākehā relationships in Aotearoa-New Zealand, England and Australia that led to the establishment here of that particular cultural institution, the school.

Lecture 5

11:30am – 12:30pm
Professor Alistair Woodward
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences – Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Lecture 6

1:30 – 2:30pm
Professor Steven Poelhekke
Faculty of Business and Economics – Economics

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Lecture 7

10:00 – 11:00am
Associate Professor Treasa Dunworth
Faculty of Law – Law

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Lecture 8

11:30am – 12:30pm
Research Fellow Kate Hannah
Faculty of Science – Physics

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Lecture 9

1:30 – 2:30pm
Dr Molly Mullen
Faculty of Education and Social Work – Critical Studies in Education 

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Is the price right? Fairness and economics

10:00 – 11:00am
Professor Ananish Chaudhuri
Faculty of Business and Economics – Economics 

Are human fair by nature? Does this natural inclination towards fairness have implications for the market-place? Traditional economic theory would perhaps think not, perceiving human interaction as self-interested at heard. This talk explores such fairness preferences in humans and show how they make a difference for matters such as pricing decisions by firms and how getting the balance wrong could have adverse consequences for businesses and others.

Lecture 11

11:30am – 12:30pm
Dr Lokesh Padhye
Faculty of Engineering – Civil and Environmental Engineering

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Lecture 12

1:30 – 2:30pm
Dr Claire Dale
Faculty of Business and Economics – Retirement Policy and Research Centre

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Do doctors really stop caring? The science of medical compassion

10:00 – 11:00am
Professor Nathan Consedine
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences – Psychological Medicine 

Compassion – the desire to alleviate suffering – is central to medicine. It is expected by regulatory bodies, patients, and physicians themselves. However, while doctors are expected to care, compassion is sometimes lacking.

Research (and opinion) tends to treat the physician as the sole source of. Doctors are blamed for failures, compassion becomes yet another “thing” for doctors to juggle, and we become blinkered to other possibilities.

Studies conducted among New Zealand doctors, nurses and medical trainees reflect a different view. Rather than see compassion as stemming from doctors alone, data from a variety of studies suggest that the patient, the clinical picture, and the work environment are also critical. Findings are discussed as helping us get past the notion that compassion is lost because doctors get tired of caring. The challenge of compassion in medicine is a system one and requires systemic solutions.

Lecture 14

11:30 – 12:30pm
Dr Peter Saxton
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences – Social and Community Health 

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

Lecture 15

1:30 – 2:30pm
Dr Jichao Zhao
Auckland Bioengineering Institute 

Session content is currently being finalised. Check back soon.

The University of Auckland City Campus

All lectures will be held at the City Campus in the University of Auckland’s General Library lecture theatres.

Comments from past participants

Spring Week is an excellent program to bring oneself up to date on current issues. After this program, I was in conversation with friends regarding its content. Highly recommended.

Harley Neil

Once again, I was thrilled to attend Spring Week, and absorb the most incredible information, facts and opinions, from such a wide range of expert lecturers. I am so grateful for their time and willingness to impart their knowledge. Many thanks!

Dawn Judge

Spring Week energized me with new ideas and a greater understanding of our world.

The opportunity to hear passionate people present on such a diverse range of subjects is both stimulating as well as providing an opportunity to follow developments in many fields of investigation and research.